This School Year, Get Involved in Your Student Senate!

The first Senate Meeting of the year was called to order by President Nick Arbaugh ‘20, beginning a year in which he hopes Senate continues to work on becoming more of an activist body on campus.

Any first-years interested in participating in this activist body must submit a cover letter and resume to Vice President Patrick Custer through email by Wednesday, September 5th at 5pm, at which time campaigning for First-Year Senators may begin. Voting will last from Monday the 17th to Friday the 21st, and there will be a table in the CUB for people to vote at.

Another great way to get involved in Student Senate is the committee system, which requires no commitment other than showing up. Parliamentarian Abby Hauer ‘21 proposed a restructuring of the former committee system, which would condense the system into fewer committees with more responsibility. Committees that would be available to serve on under the new legislation would include the Academic and Career Affairs Committee, the Budget Management Committee, the College Life Advisory Committee, the Policy Committee, the Diversity Committee, the Senate Opinions Committee, the Senate Outreach Committee and the Senate Safety and Sustainability Committee. All of these committees need people to be active members who care about the services they’re providing. The Executive Board this year has also committed to ensuring that all Senators serve on at least one committee, a rule that has always been in the Constitution but has been less than enforced in past years.

Senate Club Representatives will be given a greater voice in Senate this year, an improvement over past years where club reps have often complained that their total lack of a voice in Senate makes their presence useless. This year, as registration of clubs occurs, clubs will be asked to sort themselves into affinity groups based on their purpose of existence. Each affinity group will elect one representative to vote on budgets in Senate, giving clubs the chance to vote instead of simply existing in the room.

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